Soups

Soups have so much going for them: they are quick and easy to make, can be cooked in advance and stored in fridge or freezer until needed, and are a great way to boost our vegetable intake. They also make great convalescent food because cooking and pureeing makes them easy to digest and assimilate. Dress them up with toasted nuts or seeds, a dusting of Parmesan, a drizzle of olive oil or cashew cream or a swirl of herb coulis. The possibilities are endless!
Read More

Salads

Why stop at lettuce and tomatoes when you can throw in dried cranberries, walnuts, cubed apples, pears or fresh berries, broccoli sprouts, toasted seeds, sun-dried tomatoes, olives and a few crumbs of feta cheese? Dressings are another way to let your imagination run wild: if you vary oils (olive, walnut, hazelnut), acids (lemon or lime juice, balsamic) and herbs and spices (basil, cilantro, mint, garlic, ginger, turmeric) you can make every salad taste unique!
Read More

Eggs

Eggs are a tasty, versatile and affordable source of high-quality protein, anti-inflammatory compounds, minerals and fats. Their nutritional quality depends on what the hens that laid them ate; eggs from corn-fed battery hens contain 20 times more inflammatory omega-6 fats than those laid by hens feeding on grass, worms and insects. When you buy eggs, find out how the chickens lived and what they were fed, and aim for free-ranging, organic and omega-3 enriched.
Read More

Fish

Fish is a key element of a healthy diet -- especially fish rich in omega-3 fatty acids, such as salmon, herring, sardines, anchovies and mackerel. Oily fish is also an excellent source of important anti-cancer vitamins and minerals -- vitamin D, selenium and iodine - that aren't easily found in other foods. Aim to eat fish at least twice a week and go for smaller fish that are less likely to contain toxins like mercury.
Read More

Meat

The healthiest and tastiest meat is braised or stewed at moderate heat in some sort of sauce or broth; this is the way our ancestors cooked most of their meat. Buy the best-quality meat you can afford, ideally from pastured, free-range animals whose meat contains more nutrients and healthier fats than corn-fed animals reared in cramped conditions. You can offset the higher cost by buying smaller portions and reducing your overall meat intake.
Read More

Legumes & Grains

Beans, lentils and chickpeas have been a staple food around the Mediterranean for thousands of years, where many delicious preparations evolved for these humble but nutritious legumes. Most legumes are available pre-cooked in jars but I prefer the taste and texture of self-soaked legumes: just soak in cold water for 12 hours, drain and cook until soft. I usually cook large batches and freeze them so I have  steady supply of ready-to-use legumes.
Read More

Vegetables, Fruit

Vegetables and fruits are our staunchest allies against disease. They provide vitamins, minerals, fiber and countless plant nutrients whose role in our health is only just beginning to be understood. Don't worry -- you don't have to know their names; all you should remember is to enjoy vegetables and fruits at every meal, and eat as many different colors as possible throughout the day. Here are some tasty suggestions how to do this; many more are found in Zest for Life.
Read More

Desserts & Sweet Treats

While I'm no fan of sugar, even I enjoy the occasional birthday cake, baked dessert and sweet snack -- especially when sugar and white flour are replaced with more nutritious alternatives like honey and dried fruit, almonds, hazelnuts or walnuts and healthy seeds, as in these recipes. Of course these sweet treats are high in calories too, but at least the calories come hand-in-hand with nutrients, which makes these dishes very satisfying and allows you to stop after one portion. 
Read More

Drinks & Snacks

Healthy drinks and snacks don't have to be boring! Here I show you variations on green tea, hot lemon and dark chocolate drinks that are delicious and nutritious. Snacks, too, can -- and should -- be nutrient-dense so they keep you going without leading to blood-sugar slumps and snack-attacks. Buy a stainless-steel thermos or food tub and carry your home-made drinks and snacks with you: they not only cost less, but are much healthier than the shop-bought versions.
Read More

Amazing Grace

When our eldest son was five, we started to say grace at mealtime. Untrained in matters of gastronomic spirituality, we began by rolling a wooden cube inscribed with six child-friendly, non-denominational prayers: whichever verse landed face-up was recited. (more…)
Read More

Soups

Soups have so much going for them: they are quick and easy to make, can be cooked in advance and stored in fridge or freezer until needed, and are a great way to boost our vegetable intake. They also make great convalescent food because cooking and pureeing makes them easy to digest and assimilate. Dress them up with toasted nuts or seeds, a dusting of Parmesan, a drizzle of olive oil or cashew cream or a swirl of herb coulis. The possibilities are endless!
Read More

Salads

Why stop at lettuce and tomatoes when you can throw in dried cranberries, walnuts, cubed apples, pears or fresh berries, broccoli sprouts, toasted seeds, sun-dried tomatoes, olives and a few crumbs of feta cheese? Dressings are another way to let your imagination run wild: if you vary oils (olive, walnut, hazelnut), acids (lemon or lime juice, balsamic) and herbs and spices (basil, cilantro, mint, garlic, ginger, turmeric) you can make every salad taste unique!
Read More

Eggs

Eggs are a tasty, versatile and affordable source of high-quality protein, anti-inflammatory compounds, minerals and fats. Their nutritional quality depends on what the hens that laid them ate; eggs from corn-fed battery hens contain 20 times more inflammatory omega-6 fats than those laid by hens feeding on grass, worms and insects. When you buy eggs, find out how the chickens lived and what they were fed, and aim for free-ranging, organic and omega-3 enriched.
Read More

Fish

Fish is a key element of a healthy diet -- especially fish rich in omega-3 fatty acids, such as salmon, herring, sardines, anchovies and mackerel. Oily fish is also an excellent source of important anti-cancer vitamins and minerals -- vitamin D, selenium and iodine - that aren't easily found in other foods. Aim to eat fish at least twice a week and go for smaller fish that are less likely to contain toxins like mercury.
Read More

Meat

The healthiest and tastiest meat is braised or stewed at moderate heat in some sort of sauce or broth; this is the way our ancestors cooked most of their meat. Buy the best-quality meat you can afford, ideally from pastured, free-range animals whose meat contains more nutrients and healthier fats than corn-fed animals reared in cramped conditions. You can offset the higher cost by buying smaller portions and reducing your overall meat intake.
Read More

Legumes & Grains

Beans, lentils and chickpeas have been a staple food around the Mediterranean for thousands of years, where many delicious preparations evolved for these humble but nutritious legumes. Most legumes are available pre-cooked in jars but I prefer the taste and texture of self-soaked legumes: just soak in cold water for 12 hours, drain and cook until soft. I usually cook large batches and freeze them so I have  steady supply of ready-to-use legumes.
Read More

Vegetables, Fruit

Vegetables and fruits are our staunchest allies against disease. They provide vitamins, minerals, fiber and countless plant nutrients whose role in our health is only just beginning to be understood. Don't worry -- you don't have to know their names; all you should remember is to enjoy vegetables and fruits at every meal, and eat as many different colors as possible throughout the day. Here are some tasty suggestions how to do this; many more are found in Zest for Life.
Read More

Desserts & Sweet Treats

While I'm no fan of sugar, even I enjoy the occasional birthday cake, baked dessert and sweet snack -- especially when sugar and white flour are replaced with more nutritious alternatives like honey and dried fruit, almonds, hazelnuts or walnuts and healthy seeds, as in these recipes. Of course these sweet treats are high in calories too, but at least the calories come hand-in-hand with nutrients, which makes these dishes very satisfying and allows you to stop after one portion. 
Read More

Drinks & Snacks

Healthy drinks and snacks don't have to be boring! Here I show you variations on green tea, hot lemon and dark chocolate drinks that are delicious and nutritious. Snacks, too, can -- and should -- be nutrient-dense so they keep you going without leading to blood-sugar slumps and snack-attacks. Buy a stainless-steel thermos or food tub and carry your home-made drinks and snacks with you: they not only cost less, but are much healthier than the shop-bought versions.
Read More

Amazing Grace

When our eldest son was five, we started to say grace at mealtime. Untrained in matters of gastronomic spirituality, we began by rolling a wooden cube inscribed with six child-friendly, non-denominational prayers: whichever verse landed face-up was recited. (more…)
Read More

Soups

Soups have so much going for them: they are quick and easy to make, can be cooked in advance and stored in fridge or freezer until needed, and are a great way to boost our vegetable intake. They also make great convalescent food because cooking and pureeing makes them easy to digest and assimilate. Dress them up with toasted nuts or seeds, a dusting of Parmesan, a drizzle of olive oil or cashew cream or a swirl of herb coulis. The possibilities are endless!
Read More

Salads

Why stop at lettuce and tomatoes when you can throw in dried cranberries, walnuts, cubed apples, pears or fresh berries, broccoli sprouts, toasted seeds, sun-dried tomatoes, olives and a few crumbs of feta cheese? Dressings are another way to let your imagination run wild: if you vary oils (olive, walnut, hazelnut), acids (lemon or lime juice, balsamic) and herbs and spices (basil, cilantro, mint, garlic, ginger, turmeric) you can make every salad taste unique!
Read More

Eggs

Eggs are a tasty, versatile and affordable source of high-quality protein, anti-inflammatory compounds, minerals and fats. Their nutritional quality depends on what the hens that laid them ate; eggs from corn-fed battery hens contain 20 times more inflammatory omega-6 fats than those laid by hens feeding on grass, worms and insects. When you buy eggs, find out how the chickens lived and what they were fed, and aim for free-ranging, organic and omega-3 enriched.
Read More

Fish

Fish is a key element of a healthy diet -- especially fish rich in omega-3 fatty acids, such as salmon, herring, sardines, anchovies and mackerel. Oily fish is also an excellent source of important anti-cancer vitamins and minerals -- vitamin D, selenium and iodine - that aren't easily found in other foods. Aim to eat fish at least twice a week and go for smaller fish that are less likely to contain toxins like mercury.
Read More

Meat

The healthiest and tastiest meat is braised or stewed at moderate heat in some sort of sauce or broth; this is the way our ancestors cooked most of their meat. Buy the best-quality meat you can afford, ideally from pastured, free-range animals whose meat contains more nutrients and healthier fats than corn-fed animals reared in cramped conditions. You can offset the higher cost by buying smaller portions and reducing your overall meat intake.
Read More

Legumes & Grains

Beans, lentils and chickpeas have been a staple food around the Mediterranean for thousands of years, where many delicious preparations evolved for these humble but nutritious legumes. Most legumes are available pre-cooked in jars but I prefer the taste and texture of self-soaked legumes: just soak in cold water for 12 hours, drain and cook until soft. I usually cook large batches and freeze them so I have  steady supply of ready-to-use legumes.
Read More

Vegetables, Fruit

Vegetables and fruits are our staunchest allies against disease. They provide vitamins, minerals, fiber and countless plant nutrients whose role in our health is only just beginning to be understood. Don't worry -- you don't have to know their names; all you should remember is to enjoy vegetables and fruits at every meal, and eat as many different colors as possible throughout the day. Here are some tasty suggestions how to do this; many more are found in Zest for Life.
Read More

Desserts & Sweet Treats

While I'm no fan of sugar, even I enjoy the occasional birthday cake, baked dessert and sweet snack -- especially when sugar and white flour are replaced with more nutritious alternatives like honey and dried fruit, almonds, hazelnuts or walnuts and healthy seeds, as in these recipes. Of course these sweet treats are high in calories too, but at least the calories come hand-in-hand with nutrients, which makes these dishes very satisfying and allows you to stop after one portion. 
Read More

Drinks & Snacks

Healthy drinks and snacks don't have to be boring! Here I show you variations on green tea, hot lemon and dark chocolate drinks that are delicious and nutritious. Snacks, too, can -- and should -- be nutrient-dense so they keep you going without leading to blood-sugar slumps and snack-attacks. Buy a stainless-steel thermos or food tub and carry your home-made drinks and snacks with you: they not only cost less, but are much healthier than the shop-bought versions.
Read More

Amazing Grace

When our eldest son was five, we started to say grace at mealtime. Untrained in matters of gastronomic spirituality, we began by rolling a wooden cube inscribed with six child-friendly, non-denominational prayers: whichever verse landed face-up was recited. (more…)
Read More

Soups

Soups have so much going for them: they are quick and easy to make, can be cooked in advance and stored in fridge or freezer until needed, and are a great way to boost our vegetable intake. They also make great convalescent food because cooking and pureeing makes them easy to digest and assimilate. Dress them up with toasted nuts or seeds, a dusting of Parmesan, a drizzle of olive oil or cashew cream or a swirl of herb coulis. The possibilities are endless!
Read More

Salads

Why stop at lettuce and tomatoes when you can throw in dried cranberries, walnuts, cubed apples, pears or fresh berries, broccoli sprouts, toasted seeds, sun-dried tomatoes, olives and a few crumbs of feta cheese? Dressings are another way to let your imagination run wild: if you vary oils (olive, walnut, hazelnut), acids (lemon or lime juice, balsamic) and herbs and spices (basil, cilantro, mint, garlic, ginger, turmeric) you can make every salad taste unique!
Read More

Eggs

Eggs are a tasty, versatile and affordable source of high-quality protein, anti-inflammatory compounds, minerals and fats. Their nutritional quality depends on what the hens that laid them ate; eggs from corn-fed battery hens contain 20 times more inflammatory omega-6 fats than those laid by hens feeding on grass, worms and insects. When you buy eggs, find out how the chickens lived and what they were fed, and aim for free-ranging, organic and omega-3 enriched.
Read More

Fish

Fish is a key element of a healthy diet -- especially fish rich in omega-3 fatty acids, such as salmon, herring, sardines, anchovies and mackerel. Oily fish is also an excellent source of important anti-cancer vitamins and minerals -- vitamin D, selenium and iodine - that aren't easily found in other foods. Aim to eat fish at least twice a week and go for smaller fish that are less likely to contain toxins like mercury.
Read More

Meat

The healthiest and tastiest meat is braised or stewed at moderate heat in some sort of sauce or broth; this is the way our ancestors cooked most of their meat. Buy the best-quality meat you can afford, ideally from pastured, free-range animals whose meat contains more nutrients and healthier fats than corn-fed animals reared in cramped conditions. You can offset the higher cost by buying smaller portions and reducing your overall meat intake.
Read More

Legumes & Grains

Beans, lentils and chickpeas have been a staple food around the Mediterranean for thousands of years, where many delicious preparations evolved for these humble but nutritious legumes. Most legumes are available pre-cooked in jars but I prefer the taste and texture of self-soaked legumes: just soak in cold water for 12 hours, drain and cook until soft. I usually cook large batches and freeze them so I have  steady supply of ready-to-use legumes.
Read More

Vegetables, Fruit

Vegetables and fruits are our staunchest allies against disease. They provide vitamins, minerals, fiber and countless plant nutrients whose role in our health is only just beginning to be understood. Don't worry -- you don't have to know their names; all you should remember is to enjoy vegetables and fruits at every meal, and eat as many different colors as possible throughout the day. Here are some tasty suggestions how to do this; many more are found in Zest for Life.
Read More

Desserts & Sweet Treats

While I'm no fan of sugar, even I enjoy the occasional birthday cake, baked dessert and sweet snack -- especially when sugar and white flour are replaced with more nutritious alternatives like honey and dried fruit, almonds, hazelnuts or walnuts and healthy seeds, as in these recipes. Of course these sweet treats are high in calories too, but at least the calories come hand-in-hand with nutrients, which makes these dishes very satisfying and allows you to stop after one portion. 
Read More

Drinks & Snacks

Healthy drinks and snacks don't have to be boring! Here I show you variations on green tea, hot lemon and dark chocolate drinks that are delicious and nutritious. Snacks, too, can -- and should -- be nutrient-dense so they keep you going without leading to blood-sugar slumps and snack-attacks. Buy a stainless-steel thermos or food tub and carry your home-made drinks and snacks with you: they not only cost less, but are much healthier than the shop-bought versions.
Read More

Amazing Grace

When our eldest son was five, we started to say grace at mealtime. Untrained in matters of gastronomic spirituality, we began by rolling a wooden cube inscribed with six child-friendly, non-denominational prayers: whichever verse landed face-up was recited. (more…)
Read More

Soups

Soups have so much going for them: they are quick and easy to make, can be cooked in advance and stored in fridge or freezer until needed, and are a great way to boost our vegetable intake. They also make great convalescent food because cooking and pureeing makes them easy to digest and assimilate. Dress them up with toasted nuts or seeds, a dusting of Parmesan, a drizzle of olive oil or cashew cream or a swirl of herb coulis. The possibilities are endless!
Read More

Salads

Why stop at lettuce and tomatoes when you can throw in dried cranberries, walnuts, cubed apples, pears or fresh berries, broccoli sprouts, toasted seeds, sun-dried tomatoes, olives and a few crumbs of feta cheese? Dressings are another way to let your imagination run wild: if you vary oils (olive, walnut, hazelnut), acids (lemon or lime juice, balsamic) and herbs and spices (basil, cilantro, mint, garlic, ginger, turmeric) you can make every salad taste unique!
Read More

Eggs

Eggs are a tasty, versatile and affordable source of high-quality protein, anti-inflammatory compounds, minerals and fats. Their nutritional quality depends on what the hens that laid them ate; eggs from corn-fed battery hens contain 20 times more inflammatory omega-6 fats than those laid by hens feeding on grass, worms and insects. When you buy eggs, find out how the chickens lived and what they were fed, and aim for free-ranging, organic and omega-3 enriched.
Read More

Fish

Fish is a key element of a healthy diet -- especially fish rich in omega-3 fatty acids, such as salmon, herring, sardines, anchovies and mackerel. Oily fish is also an excellent source of important anti-cancer vitamins and minerals -- vitamin D, selenium and iodine - that aren't easily found in other foods. Aim to eat fish at least twice a week and go for smaller fish that are less likely to contain toxins like mercury.
Read More

Meat

The healthiest and tastiest meat is braised or stewed at moderate heat in some sort of sauce or broth; this is the way our ancestors cooked most of their meat. Buy the best-quality meat you can afford, ideally from pastured, free-range animals whose meat contains more nutrients and healthier fats than corn-fed animals reared in cramped conditions. You can offset the higher cost by buying smaller portions and reducing your overall meat intake.
Read More

Legumes & Grains

Beans, lentils and chickpeas have been a staple food around the Mediterranean for thousands of years, where many delicious preparations evolved for these humble but nutritious legumes. Most legumes are available pre-cooked in jars but I prefer the taste and texture of self-soaked legumes: just soak in cold water for 12 hours, drain and cook until soft. I usually cook large batches and freeze them so I have  steady supply of ready-to-use legumes.
Read More

Vegetables, Fruit

Vegetables and fruits are our staunchest allies against disease. They provide vitamins, minerals, fiber and countless plant nutrients whose role in our health is only just beginning to be understood. Don't worry -- you don't have to know their names; all you should remember is to enjoy vegetables and fruits at every meal, and eat as many different colors as possible throughout the day. Here are some tasty suggestions how to do this; many more are found in Zest for Life.
Read More

Desserts & Sweet Treats

While I'm no fan of sugar, even I enjoy the occasional birthday cake, baked dessert and sweet snack -- especially when sugar and white flour are replaced with more nutritious alternatives like honey and dried fruit, almonds, hazelnuts or walnuts and healthy seeds, as in these recipes. Of course these sweet treats are high in calories too, but at least the calories come hand-in-hand with nutrients, which makes these dishes very satisfying and allows you to stop after one portion. 
Read More

Drinks & Snacks

Healthy drinks and snacks don't have to be boring! Here I show you variations on green tea, hot lemon and dark chocolate drinks that are delicious and nutritious. Snacks, too, can -- and should -- be nutrient-dense so they keep you going without leading to blood-sugar slumps and snack-attacks. Buy a stainless-steel thermos or food tub and carry your home-made drinks and snacks with you: they not only cost less, but are much healthier than the shop-bought versions.
Read More

Amazing Grace

When our eldest son was five, we started to say grace at mealtime. Untrained in matters of gastronomic spirituality, we began by rolling a wooden cube inscribed with six child-friendly, non-denominational prayers: whichever verse landed face-up was recited. (more…)
Read More

Soups

Soups have so much going for them: they are quick and easy to make, can be cooked in advance and stored in fridge or freezer until needed, and are a great way to boost our vegetable intake. They also make great convalescent food because cooking and pureeing makes them easy to digest and assimilate. Dress them up with toasted nuts or seeds, a dusting of Parmesan, a drizzle of olive oil or cashew cream or a swirl of herb coulis. The possibilities are endless!
Read More

Salads

Why stop at lettuce and tomatoes when you can throw in dried cranberries, walnuts, cubed apples, pears or fresh berries, broccoli sprouts, toasted seeds, sun-dried tomatoes, olives and a few crumbs of feta cheese? Dressings are another way to let your imagination run wild: if you vary oils (olive, walnut, hazelnut), acids (lemon or lime juice, balsamic) and herbs and spices (basil, cilantro, mint, garlic, ginger, turmeric) you can make every salad taste unique!
Read More

Eggs

Eggs are a tasty, versatile and affordable source of high-quality protein, anti-inflammatory compounds, minerals and fats. Their nutritional quality depends on what the hens that laid them ate; eggs from corn-fed battery hens contain 20 times more inflammatory omega-6 fats than those laid by hens feeding on grass, worms and insects. When you buy eggs, find out how the chickens lived and what they were fed, and aim for free-ranging, organic and omega-3 enriched.
Read More

Fish

Fish is a key element of a healthy diet -- especially fish rich in omega-3 fatty acids, such as salmon, herring, sardines, anchovies and mackerel. Oily fish is also an excellent source of important anti-cancer vitamins and minerals -- vitamin D, selenium and iodine - that aren't easily found in other foods. Aim to eat fish at least twice a week and go for smaller fish that are less likely to contain toxins like mercury.
Read More

Meat

The healthiest and tastiest meat is braised or stewed at moderate heat in some sort of sauce or broth; this is the way our ancestors cooked most of their meat. Buy the best-quality meat you can afford, ideally from pastured, free-range animals whose meat contains more nutrients and healthier fats than corn-fed animals reared in cramped conditions. You can offset the higher cost by buying smaller portions and reducing your overall meat intake.
Read More

Legumes & Grains

Beans, lentils and chickpeas have been a staple food around the Mediterranean for thousands of years, where many delicious preparations evolved for these humble but nutritious legumes. Most legumes are available pre-cooked in jars but I prefer the taste and texture of self-soaked legumes: just soak in cold water for 12 hours, drain and cook until soft. I usually cook large batches and freeze them so I have  steady supply of ready-to-use legumes.
Read More

Vegetables, Fruit

Vegetables and fruits are our staunchest allies against disease. They provide vitamins, minerals, fiber and countless plant nutrients whose role in our health is only just beginning to be understood. Don't worry -- you don't have to know their names; all you should remember is to enjoy vegetables and fruits at every meal, and eat as many different colors as possible throughout the day. Here are some tasty suggestions how to do this; many more are found in Zest for Life.
Read More

Desserts & Sweet Treats

While I'm no fan of sugar, even I enjoy the occasional birthday cake, baked dessert and sweet snack -- especially when sugar and white flour are replaced with more nutritious alternatives like honey and dried fruit, almonds, hazelnuts or walnuts and healthy seeds, as in these recipes. Of course these sweet treats are high in calories too, but at least the calories come hand-in-hand with nutrients, which makes these dishes very satisfying and allows you to stop after one portion. 
Read More

Drinks & Snacks

Healthy drinks and snacks don't have to be boring! Here I show you variations on green tea, hot lemon and dark chocolate drinks that are delicious and nutritious. Snacks, too, can -- and should -- be nutrient-dense so they keep you going without leading to blood-sugar slumps and snack-attacks. Buy a stainless-steel thermos or food tub and carry your home-made drinks and snacks with you: they not only cost less, but are much healthier than the shop-bought versions.
Read More

Amazing Grace

When our eldest son was five, we started to say grace at mealtime. Untrained in matters of gastronomic spirituality, we began by rolling a wooden cube inscribed with six child-friendly, non-denominational prayers: whichever verse landed face-up was recited. (more…)
Read More

Soups

Soups have so much going for them: they are quick and easy to make, can be cooked in advance and stored in fridge or freezer until needed, and are a great way to boost our vegetable intake. They also make great convalescent food because cooking and pureeing makes them easy to digest and assimilate. Dress them up with toasted nuts or seeds, a dusting of Parmesan, a drizzle of olive oil or cashew cream or a swirl of herb coulis. The possibilities are endless!
Read More

Salads

Why stop at lettuce and tomatoes when you can throw in dried cranberries, walnuts, cubed apples, pears or fresh berries, broccoli sprouts, toasted seeds, sun-dried tomatoes, olives and a few crumbs of feta cheese? Dressings are another way to let your imagination run wild: if you vary oils (olive, walnut, hazelnut), acids (lemon or lime juice, balsamic) and herbs and spices (basil, cilantro, mint, garlic, ginger, turmeric) you can make every salad taste unique!
Read More

Eggs

Eggs are a tasty, versatile and affordable source of high-quality protein, anti-inflammatory compounds, minerals and fats. Their nutritional quality depends on what the hens that laid them ate; eggs from corn-fed battery hens contain 20 times more inflammatory omega-6 fats than those laid by hens feeding on grass, worms and insects. When you buy eggs, find out how the chickens lived and what they were fed, and aim for free-ranging, organic and omega-3 enriched.
Read More

Fish

Fish is a key element of a healthy diet -- especially fish rich in omega-3 fatty acids, such as salmon, herring, sardines, anchovies and mackerel. Oily fish is also an excellent source of important anti-cancer vitamins and minerals -- vitamin D, selenium and iodine - that aren't easily found in other foods. Aim to eat fish at least twice a week and go for smaller fish that are less likely to contain toxins like mercury.
Read More

Meat

The healthiest and tastiest meat is braised or stewed at moderate heat in some sort of sauce or broth; this is the way our ancestors cooked most of their meat. Buy the best-quality meat you can afford, ideally from pastured, free-range animals whose meat contains more nutrients and healthier fats than corn-fed animals reared in cramped conditions. You can offset the higher cost by buying smaller portions and reducing your overall meat intake.
Read More

Legumes & Grains

Beans, lentils and chickpeas have been a staple food around the Mediterranean for thousands of years, where many delicious preparations evolved for these humble but nutritious legumes. Most legumes are available pre-cooked in jars but I prefer the taste and texture of self-soaked legumes: just soak in cold water for 12 hours, drain and cook until soft. I usually cook large batches and freeze them so I have  steady supply of ready-to-use legumes.
Read More

Vegetables, Fruit

Vegetables and fruits are our staunchest allies against disease. They provide vitamins, minerals, fiber and countless plant nutrients whose role in our health is only just beginning to be understood. Don't worry -- you don't have to know their names; all you should remember is to enjoy vegetables and fruits at every meal, and eat as many different colors as possible throughout the day. Here are some tasty suggestions how to do this; many more are found in Zest for Life.
Read More

Desserts & Sweet Treats

While I'm no fan of sugar, even I enjoy the occasional birthday cake, baked dessert and sweet snack -- especially when sugar and white flour are replaced with more nutritious alternatives like honey and dried fruit, almonds, hazelnuts or walnuts and healthy seeds, as in these recipes. Of course these sweet treats are high in calories too, but at least the calories come hand-in-hand with nutrients, which makes these dishes very satisfying and allows you to stop after one portion. 
Read More

Drinks & Snacks

Healthy drinks and snacks don't have to be boring! Here I show you variations on green tea, hot lemon and dark chocolate drinks that are delicious and nutritious. Snacks, too, can -- and should -- be nutrient-dense so they keep you going without leading to blood-sugar slumps and snack-attacks. Buy a stainless-steel thermos or food tub and carry your home-made drinks and snacks with you: they not only cost less, but are much healthier than the shop-bought versions.
Read More

Amazing Grace

When our eldest son was five, we started to say grace at mealtime. Untrained in matters of gastronomic spirituality, we began by rolling a wooden cube inscribed with six child-friendly, non-denominational prayers: whichever verse landed face-up was recited. (more…)
Read More

Soups

Soups have so much going for them: they are quick and easy to make, can be cooked in advance and stored in fridge or freezer until needed, and are a great way to boost our vegetable intake. They also make great convalescent food because cooking and pureeing makes them easy to digest and assimilate. Dress them up with toasted nuts or seeds, a dusting of Parmesan, a drizzle of olive oil or cashew cream or a swirl of herb coulis. The possibilities are endless!
Read More

Salads

Why stop at lettuce and tomatoes when you can throw in dried cranberries, walnuts, cubed apples, pears or fresh berries, broccoli sprouts, toasted seeds, sun-dried tomatoes, olives and a few crumbs of feta cheese? Dressings are another way to let your imagination run wild: if you vary oils (olive, walnut, hazelnut), acids (lemon or lime juice, balsamic) and herbs and spices (basil, cilantro, mint, garlic, ginger, turmeric) you can make every salad taste unique!
Read More

Eggs

Eggs are a tasty, versatile and affordable source of high-quality protein, anti-inflammatory compounds, minerals and fats. Their nutritional quality depends on what the hens that laid them ate; eggs from corn-fed battery hens contain 20 times more inflammatory omega-6 fats than those laid by hens feeding on grass, worms and insects. When you buy eggs, find out how the chickens lived and what they were fed, and aim for free-ranging, organic and omega-3 enriched.
Read More

Fish

Fish is a key element of a healthy diet -- especially fish rich in omega-3 fatty acids, such as salmon, herring, sardines, anchovies and mackerel. Oily fish is also an excellent source of important anti-cancer vitamins and minerals -- vitamin D, selenium and iodine - that aren't easily found in other foods. Aim to eat fish at least twice a week and go for smaller fish that are less likely to contain toxins like mercury.
Read More

Meat

The healthiest and tastiest meat is braised or stewed at moderate heat in some sort of sauce or broth; this is the way our ancestors cooked most of their meat. Buy the best-quality meat you can afford, ideally from pastured, free-range animals whose meat contains more nutrients and healthier fats than corn-fed animals reared in cramped conditions. You can offset the higher cost by buying smaller portions and reducing your overall meat intake.
Read More

Legumes & Grains

Beans, lentils and chickpeas have been a staple food around the Mediterranean for thousands of years, where many delicious preparations evolved for these humble but nutritious legumes. Most legumes are available pre-cooked in jars but I prefer the taste and texture of self-soaked legumes: just soak in cold water for 12 hours, drain and cook until soft. I usually cook large batches and freeze them so I have  steady supply of ready-to-use legumes.
Read More

Vegetables, Fruit

Vegetables and fruits are our staunchest allies against disease. They provide vitamins, minerals, fiber and countless plant nutrients whose role in our health is only just beginning to be understood. Don't worry -- you don't have to know their names; all you should remember is to enjoy vegetables and fruits at every meal, and eat as many different colors as possible throughout the day. Here are some tasty suggestions how to do this; many more are found in Zest for Life.
Read More

Desserts & Sweet Treats

While I'm no fan of sugar, even I enjoy the occasional birthday cake, baked dessert and sweet snack -- especially when sugar and white flour are replaced with more nutritious alternatives like honey and dried fruit, almonds, hazelnuts or walnuts and healthy seeds, as in these recipes. Of course these sweet treats are high in calories too, but at least the calories come hand-in-hand with nutrients, which makes these dishes very satisfying and allows you to stop after one portion. 
Read More

Drinks & Snacks

Healthy drinks and snacks don't have to be boring! Here I show you variations on green tea, hot lemon and dark chocolate drinks that are delicious and nutritious. Snacks, too, can -- and should -- be nutrient-dense so they keep you going without leading to blood-sugar slumps and snack-attacks. Buy a stainless-steel thermos or food tub and carry your home-made drinks and snacks with you: they not only cost less, but are much healthier than the shop-bought versions.
Read More

Amazing Grace

When our eldest son was five, we started to say grace at mealtime. Untrained in matters of gastronomic spirituality, we began by rolling a wooden cube inscribed with six child-friendly, non-denominational prayers: whichever verse landed face-up was recited. (more…)
Read More

Soups

Soups have so much going for them: they are quick and easy to make, can be cooked in advance and stored in fridge or freezer until needed, and are a great way to boost our vegetable intake. They also make great convalescent food because cooking and pureeing makes them easy to digest and assimilate. Dress them up with toasted nuts or seeds, a dusting of Parmesan, a drizzle of olive oil or cashew cream or a swirl of herb coulis. The possibilities are endless!
Read More

Salads

Why stop at lettuce and tomatoes when you can throw in dried cranberries, walnuts, cubed apples, pears or fresh berries, broccoli sprouts, toasted seeds, sun-dried tomatoes, olives and a few crumbs of feta cheese? Dressings are another way to let your imagination run wild: if you vary oils (olive, walnut, hazelnut), acids (lemon or lime juice, balsamic) and herbs and spices (basil, cilantro, mint, garlic, ginger, turmeric) you can make every salad taste unique!
Read More

Eggs

Eggs are a tasty, versatile and affordable source of high-quality protein, anti-inflammatory compounds, minerals and fats. Their nutritional quality depends on what the hens that laid them ate; eggs from corn-fed battery hens contain 20 times more inflammatory omega-6 fats than those laid by hens feeding on grass, worms and insects. When you buy eggs, find out how the chickens lived and what they were fed, and aim for free-ranging, organic and omega-3 enriched.
Read More

Fish

Fish is a key element of a healthy diet -- especially fish rich in omega-3 fatty acids, such as salmon, herring, sardines, anchovies and mackerel. Oily fish is also an excellent source of important anti-cancer vitamins and minerals -- vitamin D, selenium and iodine - that aren't easily found in other foods. Aim to eat fish at least twice a week and go for smaller fish that are less likely to contain toxins like mercury.
Read More

Meat

The healthiest and tastiest meat is braised or stewed at moderate heat in some sort of sauce or broth; this is the way our ancestors cooked most of their meat. Buy the best-quality meat you can afford, ideally from pastured, free-range animals whose meat contains more nutrients and healthier fats than corn-fed animals reared in cramped conditions. You can offset the higher cost by buying smaller portions and reducing your overall meat intake.
Read More

Legumes & Grains

Beans, lentils and chickpeas have been a staple food around the Mediterranean for thousands of years, where many delicious preparations evolved for these humble but nutritious legumes. Most legumes are available pre-cooked in jars but I prefer the taste and texture of self-soaked legumes: just soak in cold water for 12 hours, drain and cook until soft. I usually cook large batches and freeze them so I have  steady supply of ready-to-use legumes.
Read More

Vegetables, Fruit

Vegetables and fruits are our staunchest allies against disease. They provide vitamins, minerals, fiber and countless plant nutrients whose role in our health is only just beginning to be understood. Don't worry -- you don't have to know their names; all you should remember is to enjoy vegetables and fruits at every meal, and eat as many different colors as possible throughout the day. Here are some tasty suggestions how to do this; many more are found in Zest for Life.
Read More

Desserts & Sweet Treats

While I'm no fan of sugar, even I enjoy the occasional birthday cake, baked dessert and sweet snack -- especially when sugar and white flour are replaced with more nutritious alternatives like honey and dried fruit, almonds, hazelnuts or walnuts and healthy seeds, as in these recipes. Of course these sweet treats are high in calories too, but at least the calories come hand-in-hand with nutrients, which makes these dishes very satisfying and allows you to stop after one portion. 
Read More

Drinks & Snacks

Healthy drinks and snacks don't have to be boring! Here I show you variations on green tea, hot lemon and dark chocolate drinks that are delicious and nutritious. Snacks, too, can -- and should -- be nutrient-dense so they keep you going without leading to blood-sugar slumps and snack-attacks. Buy a stainless-steel thermos or food tub and carry your home-made drinks and snacks with you: they not only cost less, but are much healthier than the shop-bought versions.
Read More

Amazing Grace

When our eldest son was five, we started to say grace at mealtime. Untrained in matters of gastronomic spirituality, we began by rolling a wooden cube inscribed with six child-friendly, non-denominational prayers: whichever verse landed face-up was recited. (more…)
Read More

Soups

Soups have so much going for them: they are quick and easy to make, can be cooked in advance and stored in fridge or freezer until needed, and are a great way to boost our vegetable intake. They also make great convalescent food because cooking and pureeing makes them easy to digest and assimilate. Dress them up with toasted nuts or seeds, a dusting of Parmesan, a drizzle of olive oil or cashew cream or a swirl of herb coulis. The possibilities are endless!
Read More

Salads

Why stop at lettuce and tomatoes when you can throw in dried cranberries, walnuts, cubed apples, pears or fresh berries, broccoli sprouts, toasted seeds, sun-dried tomatoes, olives and a few crumbs of feta cheese? Dressings are another way to let your imagination run wild: if you vary oils (olive, walnut, hazelnut), acids (lemon or lime juice, balsamic) and herbs and spices (basil, cilantro, mint, garlic, ginger, turmeric) you can make every salad taste unique!
Read More

Eggs

Eggs are a tasty, versatile and affordable source of high-quality protein, anti-inflammatory compounds, minerals and fats. Their nutritional quality depends on what the hens that laid them ate; eggs from corn-fed battery hens contain 20 times more inflammatory omega-6 fats than those laid by hens feeding on grass, worms and insects. When you buy eggs, find out how the chickens lived and what they were fed, and aim for free-ranging, organic and omega-3 enriched.
Read More

Fish

Fish is a key element of a healthy diet -- especially fish rich in omega-3 fatty acids, such as salmon, herring, sardines, anchovies and mackerel. Oily fish is also an excellent source of important anti-cancer vitamins and minerals -- vitamin D, selenium and iodine - that aren't easily found in other foods. Aim to eat fish at least twice a week and go for smaller fish that are less likely to contain toxins like mercury.
Read More

Meat

The healthiest and tastiest meat is braised or stewed at moderate heat in some sort of sauce or broth; this is the way our ancestors cooked most of their meat. Buy the best-quality meat you can afford, ideally from pastured, free-range animals whose meat contains more nutrients and healthier fats than corn-fed animals reared in cramped conditions. You can offset the higher cost by buying smaller portions and reducing your overall meat intake.
Read More

Legumes & Grains

Beans, lentils and chickpeas have been a staple food around the Mediterranean for thousands of years, where many delicious preparations evolved for these humble but nutritious legumes. Most legumes are available pre-cooked in jars but I prefer the taste and texture of self-soaked legumes: just soak in cold water for 12 hours, drain and cook until soft. I usually cook large batches and freeze them so I have  steady supply of ready-to-use legumes.
Read More

Vegetables, Fruit

Vegetables and fruits are our staunchest allies against disease. They provide vitamins, minerals, fiber and countless plant nutrients whose role in our health is only just beginning to be understood. Don't worry -- you don't have to know their names; all you should remember is to enjoy vegetables and fruits at every meal, and eat as many different colors as possible throughout the day. Here are some tasty suggestions how to do this; many more are found in Zest for Life.
Read More

Desserts & Sweet Treats

While I'm no fan of sugar, even I enjoy the occasional birthday cake, baked dessert and sweet snack -- especially when sugar and white flour are replaced with more nutritious alternatives like honey and dried fruit, almonds, hazelnuts or walnuts and healthy seeds, as in these recipes. Of course these sweet treats are high in calories too, but at least the calories come hand-in-hand with nutrients, which makes these dishes very satisfying and allows you to stop after one portion. 
Read More

Drinks & Snacks

Healthy drinks and snacks don't have to be boring! Here I show you variations on green tea, hot lemon and dark chocolate drinks that are delicious and nutritious. Snacks, too, can -- and should -- be nutrient-dense so they keep you going without leading to blood-sugar slumps and snack-attacks. Buy a stainless-steel thermos or food tub and carry your home-made drinks and snacks with you: they not only cost less, but are much healthier than the shop-bought versions.
Read More

Amazing Grace

When our eldest son was five, we started to say grace at mealtime. Untrained in matters of gastronomic spirituality, we began by rolling a wooden cube inscribed with six child-friendly, non-denominational prayers: whichever verse landed face-up was recited. (more…)
Read More